Lunchtime art


Lunchtime art

Pencil and charcoal sketch based on Ballet Dancers by Degas



Popped into the National Gallery yesterday lunchtime (the joys of working in Trafalgar Square) and went to the exhibition Richard Hamilton: The Late Works. Not an artist I know much about, I was intrigued by his use of Photoshop to create his later works. Coincidentally earlier in the day I was listening to Women’s Hour on BBC Radio 4 discussing women and the Royal Academy and that one of the biggest changes in how new and emerging artists are working currently is the greater use of digital media and Photoshop. I often use the procreate app on iPad to sketch out a painting, particularly where it is a painting that is based on a photograph. Partly I’m being lazy in trying to miss out doing too many detailed pencil sketches, but partly I’m being almost superstitious really; I feel that if I sketch something too much and in too much detail before painting it loses some of the magic that can happen when an idea comes alive on the canvas, it loses the spontaneity and the transference of my emotions into the finished piece. I suppose for the same reason I don’t like pieces that take too long to complete. Ideally I want to spend a day nonstop on it and keep going until it’s done, so that the finished painting is a product of the moments in which it was created. But blah blah blah…

It was also really nice see all the school children in the National gallery, sitting on the floor staring up at paintings, listening to talks with an interest and enthusiasm that I didn’t think was possible from a group of 7 year olds. It was like some Utopian liberal arts vision of the future where young children hang out in art galleries instead of playing computer games. I had gone there because, well firstly it’s just across the road from work, secondly it’s free, and thirdly I fancied having a look at a bit of Degas. I have a vision of one of my paintings for the Femme Fatale exhibition being a bit burlesque and a bit ballet. Onward then.